As a parent, one of the worst experiences is seeing your child hurt or in pain. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) provides information about seven of the ways that children can be injured in unintentional accidents.

Seven Common Causes of Childhood Injuries

  • Burns

The CDC estimates that 300 children a day are treated for burn-related injuries in hospitals in the United States. At least two of those cases are fatal. Injuries from hot liquids are a common cause of burn injuries in younger children, while flame burns are a probable cause of burn injuries in older children. The CDC provides several burn prevention tips, including installing smoke detectors throughout your home and adopting safe cooking practices.

  • Drowning

Drowning is another common cause of unintentional death and injury for young children. It is the leading cause of accidental death for children between the ages of one and 14. Other than birth defects, drowning kills more children between the ages of one and four than any other cause of death.

Parents must be very cautious to prevent drowning deaths. All parents should learn CPR and take steps to protect children around pools and other bodies of water. A small child can drown in a few inches of water, so parents should always supervise children while taking a bath too.

  • Falls

The CDC lists falls as the leading cause of non-fatal injuries for children. It estimates that 8,000 children are treated for fall-related injuries each day in the United States or 2.8 million each year. Many fall injuries can be avoided through prevention. The CDC recommends that parents inspect playgrounds to check for unsafe equipment, utilize safety devices in the home to prevent falls, and use protective gear for playing sports or participating in recreational activities.

  • Poisoning

Poisoning is the cause of two childhood deaths and 300 childhood injuries each day throughout the country. Common household items can be deadly, including medications and cleaning. Prevention tips include securing products that are dangerous to keep them away from children and throw away items that are no longer needed. Parents need to know the steps to take if their child is accidentally poisoned.

  • Traffic-Related Accidents

Motor vehicle accidents are another common cause of accidental injury and death for children. It is estimated that 150 children are treated in emergency rooms each hour for injuries sustained in traffic accidents. One of the most effective ways to prevent injuries in traffic accidents is to ensure your child is properly secured in a child safety restraint every time your child is in the car. Also, parents need to use safe driving practices to reduce the risk of being involved in a traffic accident.

  • Sports Accidents

Recreational and sports activities are another cause of unintentional injuries for children. Each year, over 2.6 million children are treated in emergency rooms for sports or recreational injuries. Parents can take steps to reduce the risk of injury when their children are playing sports or participating in recreational activities. Using protective gear and the correct equipment is just one way parents can reduce the risk of injury.

  • Playground Injuries

Over 200,000 children 14 years and younger are treated in emergency rooms for playground-related injuries. Over 20,000 sustain traumatic brain injuries because of the accident. The injuries from playground-related accidents can result in permanent impairments and disabilities. Parents must take steps to reduce the risk of playground-related injuries. The CDC suggests using playgrounds with soft material on the ground to cushion falls and checking for guardrails to help prevent falls.

Call a Fresno Childhood Injury Lawyer for Help

If your child is injured in an accident, you need to protect his or her legal rights. Our Fresno childhood injury attorneys can help. For a free case review and free legal consultation, call Torem & Associates at (559) 500-5000 or 1-800-954-4444 or use the contact form on our website to request additional information.